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Smile: A Collection of Academic References

The resesarch blah blah blah

Abbey, A. (1982). Sex differences in attributions for friendly behavior: Do males misperceive females’ friendliness? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 42, 830–838.

Abbey, A. (1987). Misperceptions of friendly behavior as sexual interest: A survey of naturally occurring incidents. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 11, 173–194.

Abbey, A., & Melby, C. (1986). The effects of nonverbal cues on gender differences in perceptions of sexual intent. Sex Roles, 15, 283–297.

Adolphs, R., Tranel, D., & Damasio, A. R. (1998). The human amygdala in social judgment. Nature, 393, 470–474.

Cohn, J. F., & Schmidt, K. S. (2003). The timing of facial motion in posed and spontaneous smiles. In Proc. 2nd international conference on active media technology (ICMAT 2003), Chongqing, China, pp. 57–72.

Ekman, P., Davidson, R. J., & Friesen, W. V. (1990). The Duchenne smile: Emotional expression and brain physiology: II. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 58, 342-353.

Frank, M. G., Ekman, P., & Friesen, W. V. (1993). Behavioral markers and recognizability of the smile of enjoyment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 64, 83-93.

Hall, J. A., Carney, D. R., & Murphy, N. A. (2002). Gender differences in smiling. In M. H. Abel (Eds.), An empirical reflection on the smile (pp. 187–216). New York: Edwin Mellen Press.

Hall, J. A., Carter, J. D., & Horgan, T. G. (2000). Gender differences in nonverbal communication of emotion. In A. H. Fischer (Eds.), Gender and emotion: Social psychological perspectives (pp. 97–117). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Harris, R. H. (2005) Facial expressions, smile types, and self-report during humor, tickle, and pain. Cognition and Emotion, 19, 655-669.

Hecht, M. A., & LaFrance, M. (1998). License or obligation to smile: The effect of power and sex on amount and type of smiling: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 24, 1332–1342.

Hess, U., Adams, R. B., Jr., & Kleck, R. E. (2004). Facial appearance, gender, and emotion expression. Emotion, 4, 378–388.

Hess, U., Adams, R. B., Jr., & Kleck, R. E. (2005). Who may frown and who should smile? Dominance, affiliation, and the display of happiness and anger. Cognition and Emotion, 19, 515–536.

Hess, U., Beaupre ́, M. G., & Cheung, N. (2002). Who to whom and why-Cultural differences and similarities in the function of smiles. In M. H. Abel (Eds.), An empirical reflection on the smile (pp. 187–216). New York: Edwin Mellen Press.

Hinsz, V. B., & Tomhave, J. A. (1991). Smile and (half) the world smiles with you, frown and you frown alone. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 17, 586-592.

Kleinke, C. L., & Walton, J. H. (1982). Influence of reinforced smiling on affective responses in an interview. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 42, 557-565.

Kleinke, C. L., Peterson, T. R., & Rutledge, T. R. (1998). Effects of self-generated facial expressions on mood. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74, 272-279.

Kret, M. E., & de Gelder, B. (2010). Social context influences recognition of bodily expressions. Experimental Brain Research, 203, 169–180.

LaFrance, M., Hecht, M. A., & Paluck, E. L. (2003). The contingent smile: A meta-analysis of sex differences in smiling. Psychological Bulletin, 129, 305-334.

Lee, E., Kang, J. I., Park, I. H., Kim, J., & An, S. K. (2008). Is a neutral face really evaluated as being emotionally neutral? Psychiatry Research, 157, 77–85.

Mignault, A., & Chaudhuri, A. (2003). The many faces of a neutral face: Head tilt and perception of dominance and emotion. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 27, 111–132.

Moore, M. M. (1985). Nonverbal courtship patterns in women. Ethology and Sociobiology, 6, 237–247.

Muehlenhard, C. L., Koralewski, M. A., Andrews, S. L., & Burdick, C. A. (1986). Verbal and nonverbal cues that convey interest in dating: Two studies. Behavior Therapy, 17, 404–419.

Niedenthal, P.M., Halberstadt, J.B., & Setterlund, M.B. (1997). Being happy and seeing ‘‘happy’’: Emotional state mediates visual word recognition. Cognition and Emotion, 11, 403–432.

Otta, E., Abrosio, F. F. E., & Hoshino, R. L. (1996). Reading a smiling face: Messages conveyed by various forms of smiling. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 82, 1111–1121.

Pugh, S. D. (2001). Service with a smile: Emotional contagion in the service encounter. Academy of Management Journal, 44, 1018–1027.

Reis, H. T., McDougal Wilson, I., Monestere, C., Bernstein, S., Clark, K., Seidl, E., Franco, M., Giodioso, E., Freeman, L., & Radoane, K. (1990). What is smiling is beautiful and good. European Journal of Social Psychology, 20, 259–267.

Schmid Mast, M., & Hall, J. A. (2004). When is dominance related to smiling? Assigned dominance, dominance preference, trait dominance, and gender as moderators. Sex Roles, 50, 387–399.

Schmid Mast, M., & Hall, J. A. (2004). When is dominance related to smiling? Assigned dominance, dominance preference, trait dominance, and gender as moderators. Sex Roles, 50, 387–399.

Schmid Mast, M., & Hall, J. A. (2004). Who is the boss and who is not? Accuracy of judging status. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 28, 145–165.

Schmidt, K. L., Cohn, J. F., & Tian, Y. (2003). Signal characteristics of spontaneous facial expressions: automatic movement in solitary and social smiles. Biological Psychology, 65, 49–66.

Strack, F., Martin, L., & Stepper, S. (1988). Inhibiting and facilitating conditions of the human smile: A non-obtrusive test of the facial feedback hypothesis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54, 768–777.

Trougakos, P. J. (2011) Service without a smile: Comparing the consequences of neutral and positive display rules. Journal of Applied Psychology 2011, Vol. 96, No. 2, 350–362

Vrugt, A. (2007). Effects of a smile: Reciprocation and compliance with a request. Psychological Reports, 101, 1196-1202.

Vrugt, A., & Van Eechoud, M. (2002). Smiling and self-presentation of men and women for job photographs. European Journal of Social Psychology, 32, 419-431.

Vrugt, A., Vet, C. (2009) Effects of a smile on mood and helping behavior. Social Behavior and Personality. 37(9), 1251-1258.

Wehrle, T., Kaiser, S., Schmidt, S., & Scherer, K. R. (2000). Studying the dynamics of emotional expression using synthesized facial muscle movements. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 105–119.

Willis, M., Palermo, R. (2011). Judging Approachability on the Face of It: The Influence of Face and Body Expressions on the Perception of Approachability. American Psychological Association 2011, Vol. 11, No. 3, 514–523

Winston, J. S., Strange, B. A., O’Doherty, J., & Dolan, R. J. (2002). Automatic and intentional brain responses during evaluation of trust- worthiness of faces. Nature Neuroscience, 5, 277–283.

 

 

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